Does Stretching Weaken Our Muscles?

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Did you know that for all of the attention we yogis place on the topic of stretching, there are many (many!) unsupported beliefs about this simple activity that permeate the yoga world? I've covered several misconceptions about stretching before and will continue to do so, such as:

-stretching & strengthening are opposites ---> myth!

-stretching a muscle "releases" it ---> myth!

-stretching our connective tissue can lengthen it out so it becomes lax ---> myth!


But today I'd like to focus on one myth in particular that I don't believe I've addressed recently. This myth is the common claim that stretching weakens our muscles.

We often hear this claim in the form of warnings like "stop stretching your hamstrings because it weakens them". Or "sitting weakens your glutes" (because they're in a stretched position when you're sitting in a chair).

This claim is also at the root of beliefs about posture, such as rounded-forward shoulders (often referred to as "upper crossed syndrome"), in which we're told that the rhomboids (mid-back muscles) are "long & weak" because they're in a stretched position.

Now if you know my work at all, you know I'm a huge proponent of yogis incorporating strength into their yoga practice. And a large portion of the yoga world seems to be moving in this direction as well, which makes me very happy!

But as with all perspective shifts, the pendulum tends to swing toward extremes before it settles somewhere in the more grounded, evidence-based middle. Along with the widespread enthusiasm for strengthening, there is a large amount of fearmongering about passive stretching taking place in the yoga world today.

Although strengthening is indeed awesome for us, this doesn't mean that stretching is bad for us. And if you refer back to the common myths I listed above, you'll note that stretching & strengthening aren't opposites anyway, so there's no need for us to pit them against each other. We can be pro-strengthening without being anti-stretching!

Which brings me back to today's stretching myth. One common claim we hear that gives the mistaken impression that stretching is bad for us is the myth that stretching weakens our muscles. I'd like to bust this myth once and for all, using the handy tool of muscle physiology.

What is the one way in which muscles become stronger? When they contract against a high enough resistance that they are stimulated to adapt to increase the amount of force they can generate. Our muscles strengthen when they do strong work: lowering slowly into chaturanga, moving heavy weights around, etc.

Knowing this, what is therefore the one way in which muscles become weaker? The one and only way that muscles grow weaker is when they don't do strengthening work. That's it! If we don't expose our muscles to progressive loads, they will weaken.

Whether we stretch or not has nothing to do with muscles strengthening or weakening. Strengthening has to do with force production, while stretching has to do with tissue extensibility. These are two separate qualities.

The claim that stretching muscles weakens them is completely unsupported by science. Which means that we now have one less reason to fearmonger about stretching! :)

For a deeper dive into what we do (and don't) know about stretching, consider my online mini-workshop How Stretching Affects the Tissues of the Body. As many yogis who have taken this workshop have expressed, this should be required info for ALL yoga teachers!

My mentor Jules Mitchell's brand new book Yoga Biomechanics: Stretching Redefined is also an excellent, thorough resource on all things stretching. I highly recommend it!

EXPERT Q&A ON YOGA, STRETCHING & INJURIES W/GREG LEHMAN

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As a member of the yoga community for many years, I regularly hear claims made about how stretching affects the body. These claims vary widely, and I’ve heard everything from “stretching is a magical cure that will heal all of your ailments” to “stretching is damaging for the body, and therefore yoga is bad for us.”

I try to be as evidence-based as possible in my approach to yoga, so I’m naturally skeptical of claims that appear to lack scientific support. In order to clarify some of the truth versus fiction regarding stretching for both myself and the greater yoga community, I decided to consult with an expert who is extremely up-to-date on the most current scientific research on stretching.

Dr. Greg Lehman, BKin, MSc, DC, MScPT, is a Clinical Educator, Physiotherapist, Chiropractor, and Strength and Conditioning Specialist. He travels the world teaching his Reconciling Biomechanics with Pain Science course to health & fitness professionals. He is also the creator of the “Recovery Strategies” pain workbook, which is an amazing, informative, and free resource for anyone in pain. Greg’s work has had a profound impact on the therapeutic, fitness, and yoga/movement worlds, and I am incredibly honored to feature his insight on my blog!

YOGA & STRETCHING Q&A W/GREG LEHMAN

QUESTION 1: In the yoga world, there is a widespread claim that stretching can lengthen connective tissues like ligaments & tendons, causing them to become lax and leading to "joint instability". Is this a biologically plausible assertion?

ANSWER: There is no evidence that this actually happens.  Pretty unbelievable, eh? There is certainly more evidence that suggests when you pull (apply tension) to connective tissue it responds by getting stiffer, stronger and sometimes thicker.  Old research by Dr. Woo has shown this consistently.  The only consistent thing that can make connective tissue less stiff is immobilization and injury.  So, it is possible that people who gain massive amounts of flexibility may have at some point damaged their tissue. 

If people feel “lax” because they stretch I would guess that it would be more of muscle or nervous system change.  People may not have the strength in those ranges to control the motion rather than the idea that they lengthened connective tissue constraints.

 

QUESTION 2: What exactly does "stability" mean when it comes to our joints, and is there evidence to support that a lack of joint stability causes pain and/or dysfunction?

ANSWER: A stable joint system just means when it gets perturbed or jostled it comes back to its resting place.  But, people have expanded the definition to mean that a joint just moves a lot when you don’t want it to move.  Joint instability is a problem when a joint pops out of place and does not readily go back into place.  It certainly does happen but I doubt it’s that common.

 

QUESTION 3: Can passively stretching a muscle compromise its strength (i.e. decrease its ability to produce force)?

ANSWER: Not significantly, meaning 1-5% of max force production [if stretching immediately prior to a strength activity].  And since we regularly don’t need to produce max force it’s not really an issue.  And you only get this transient force reduction when you hold a static stretch for 45 or more seconds.  Some research (Blazevich) even suggests that these max force/power losses are mitigated or completely ameliorated provided you do a warm up.

There is no reason to think that long-term stretching will make you weak.

 

QUESTION 4: Aside from concerns about lengthening ligaments & tendons that we've already covered here, is it inherently injurious or damaging for the body to spend time in passive end range stretches? What about for someone with a connective tissue disorder such as generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS)?

ANSWER: I think with EDS it makes sense to limit those movements and get strong instead.  That’s one of those conditions where shit really does pop out of place.  But for other people, who cares if you hang out at end range. You are just applying tensile load to tissue (pretty much what strength training does but at other ROMs) and the tissue will adapt by getting stronger. 

We aren’t made of taffy.  We don’t really “stretch” that way with applied loading like end ROM stretching.  I don’t think it’s injurious but you could certainly argue that there are better options to achieve health and mobility – like adding strength training or even resistance throughout the range of motion.

 

QUESTION 5: There is a growing dialog in the yoga world about the distinction between active & passive stretching, with a new emphasis being placed on the benefits of training active strength & control through our ranges of motion ("active stretching") and a de-emphasis being placed on passive stretching. The reasoning goes that if we have more passive ROM available at a joint than active ROM, we are more susceptible to injury because we lack "control" in those end ranges. Would you agree with this line of thought?

ANSWER: I think you should do both.  I wouldn’t be worried about injury though.  I don’t think most people are getting injured because they have lost “control” of the joint.  Further, if you get injured because the joint suddenly goes to end ROM, it’s not strength at end ROM that would have helped you - it’s the strength and control that you needed before you went to end ROM. 

 

QUESTION 6: Many long-term yoga practitioners have discovered through imaging that they have a hip labral tear, and yoga is often blamed as the cause of this tear. Given that yoga is a low-load activity and that a majority of people in general will develop an asymptomatic labral tear as they age [Ref, Ref, Ref, Ref], is a long-term yoga practice a likely cause of a hip labral tear?

ANSWER: Labral tears are common. Heck, they might even be beneficial for performance.  It’s not unreasonable to think that ANY activity can predispose you to joint changes.  They happen and I doubt there is much we can do about it.  You will see labral tears and bony changes in most sports. 

So should we stop physical activity because of the chance of a labral tear? No. There are way too many benefits from a movement practice that far outweigh the negatives of a potential increase in the chance of having a labral tear.

 

QUESTION 7: In terms of stretching physiology, I believe that many people conflate the "muscle spindle stretch reflex" (reflexive muscular contraction during a stretch) with "stretch tolerance" (tolerating the discomfort of stretching) in their minds. Could you describe the difference between these two phenomena? Do they both play a role in stopping us at the end range of a stretch?

ANSWER: I’m not sure to be honest.  Stretch tolerance definitely plays a role as the stretch is stopped (in the experimental studies) when the participant says its too much.  What happens with long term stretching is that you are able to go farther without there being a dramatic change in tissue qualities.  Meaning we assume that the changes in ROM are due to your tolerance or perhaps habituation rather than a structural change.

The muscle spindle stretch reflex is assumed to not be occurring during end ROM stretching because in these studies they monitor muscle activity.  Meaning, they try to make sure there is no measurable muscle activity that occurs at end ROM.  We assume its just a passive resistance to stretch.  However, it is plausible that there is minor amount of activity that isn’t being picked up and this could be “putting on the brakes”.

 

QUESTION 8: Do you believe there are ways in which passive stretching could actually be beneficial for the body on a musculoskeletal level? If so, how?

ANSWER: Yes.  I think long term stretching is just passive tensile force and tension has the ability to create positive structural adaptations in tissue.  Some (Kubo) have argued that passive stretching can make tendon more efficient.  Others suggest that passive stretching influences muscle stiffness which might be good to balance the stiffness changes in a tendon that can occur with injury.

I certainly don’t view stretching as a negative which I once did.  I think if you argue against stretching you are really not “against” stretching but more pro some other intervention.  So, if you like to stretch and its helpful for you I would encourage you to keep it up. 

THANK YOU AGAIN TO GREG FOR HIS GENEROSITY IN SHARING HIS KNOWLEDGE AND INSIGHT WITH THE YOGA COMMUNITY. I HOPE YOU FOUND THIS INTERVIEW INFORMATIVE AND HELPFUL FOR YOUR YOGA PRACTICE & TEACHING! -JENNI

Learn much more from Greg Lehman on his website here, and follow him on Twitter!


Stretching Misconceptions in the Yoga World

Does stretching make our muscles longer? Does stretching weaken our tissues and de-stabilize our joints? Can “overstretching” give us lax ligaments? Does stretching apply enough stress to our tissues to make them stronger?

There are a lot (a lot!) of claims about stretching that tend to circulate in the yoga community, and not all of these claims are accurate! Did you know?

“Histology” is the branch of biology dealing with the study of the tissues of the body. And from what I can see in the yoga world, many of the claims that we hear about stretching simply don’t jive with what histology/science has revealed about the properties of human connective tissue (including ligaments & tendons) and muscle tissue.

I really appreciated it when the incredibly knowledgeable Greg Lehman stated this quote I’ve featured here during his presentation to us at Jules Mitchell’s 300-hr yoga teacher training that I recently completed. Thank you, Greg!

And for more clarity and some foundational science about stretching, yoga, and which claims are cool and which ones we should definitely retire, check out my new online mini-workshop “How Stretching Affects the Tissues of the Body!”

See you in the workshop for some excellent yoga geeky learning!

What Does "Yoga Butt" Mean? Settling the Age-Old Question

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Have you ever heard of the term "yoga butt"? If so, do you know what it means? In my experience, this term is a bit confusing because it has two different definitions that are both commonly used in the yoga world.

 

YOGA BUTT DEFINITION #1

The first definition has to do with the idea that the practice of yoga gives yogis firm, attractive backsides - the appearance of which is often colloquially referred to as "yoga butt".

[Side note: I find this first definition ironic because in all honesty, traditional yoga does not challenge the glutes enough to create very firm and toned backsides in the first place. It really doesn't! But that's another topic for another blog post - and if you happen to be a yogi who is interested in some actual focused glute work within a yoga context, consider trying my "Recruit the Glutes" practice in my online yoga class library! It's a great class that does have a good chance of helping yogis to create a yoga butt, if that's something they desire. :) ]

 

YOGA BUTT DEFINITION #2

This first definition for "yoga butt" was all that I knew throughout my earlier yoga days. But later on, I started hearing about a new, alternative definition of the term. "Yoga butt" had also come to be known as a nagging, irritating pain that many yogis experienced in their "butt" area - specifically at the very top of their hamstrings, where these muscles attach to the sitting bones (or ischial tuberosities in anatomy-speak).

This "yoga butt" pain is often exacerbated when yogis fold forward or perform a "hip hinge" type movement like uttanasana (standing forward fold), paschimottanasana (seated forward fold), or virabhadrasana III (warrior 3). And this yoga butt pain is surprisingly common in the yoga world. In fact, it's rare to meet a long-time yogi who has either never experienced this version of yoga butt or doesn't know someone who has.

 

SETTLING THE AGE-OLD QUESTION

Because there are clearly two different definitions for the same term being used concurrently in the yoga world, I decided to put out an "anatomy geeky" survey on my Instagram page last week that asked:

What does "yoga butt" mean? A) an aesthetically-pleasing gluteus maximus or B) proximal hamstring tendinopathy?

Because the "cute butt" definition was the one that I personally had known long before I learned about the "hamstring pain" definition, my prediction was that the majority of votes would be for option A. But to my surprise, these were the results of the poll:

 

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Clearly, the hamstring pain definition was the winner by a wide margin. (77% to 23% - in politics that would be a huge landslide!) The fact that so many more yogis associate the term "yoga butt" with pain than with a cute derriere reveals just how widespread the problem of high hamstring tendinopathy truly is in the yoga community.

And luckily, my brand new online program  "5 Weeks to Strong, Flexible Hamstrings" is designed to address this exact issue! Why, you might ask?

 

HOW DOES HAMSTRING STRENGTHENING HELP YOGA BUTT?

Well, the main reason that so many yogis experience pain at their proximal hamstrings tendons is that although yoga is full of a high amount of passive hamstring stretching in forward bend positions (which repetitively compresses the hamstrings tendons on the bony protrusion of the sitting bones), yoga includes very few, if any, hamstring-strengthening moves.

We know that in order for our hamstrings and their tendons to be resilient and healthy, they need to have a high capacity for load tolerance. And the only way we can increase our hamstrings' capacity to tolerate load is to strengthen them. (Passive stretching and other passive techniques like self-massage and rolling do not load tissues enough to ask them to adapt.)

And this is why my new online program is perfect for yogis: it fills in a missing gap that traditional yoga classes miss out on completely: the important ingredient of hamstring strengthening. If you or any of your yogi friends have an experience of high hamstring pain, this new program might be a perfect solution. (And as a side note, this program is also excellent for anyone who feels that they have "tight" or inflexible hamstrings. It's also ideal for anyone who simply wants to strengthen their hamstrings because yoga does not strengthen them, which is a good idea for all of us yogis!)

Check this new offering out, and feel free to let me know if you have any questions at all.

I'll see you and your hamstrings in my excellent new program!

Mobility, Stability, & Flexibility: Clarifying Our Concepts in Yoga

I'm more than excited about my newest article in Yoga International that just published this morning! We tend to use the words mobility, stability, and flexibility all the time in yoga, but what do these terms actually mean?

The information I write about in this piece changed my whole perspective on yoga and movement, and I think these concepts have the power to change our yoga community’s entire approach to asana if this message spreads. There is so much value in getting clear on our terms & definitions!

I’m very thankful for the positive feedback I’ve received so far on this piece - I hope you enjoy it if you check it out!

5 Things We Didn't Learn About the SI Joint in Yoga Teacher Training

Today I'd like to offer 5 insights about the SI joint (or sacroiliac joint) that we don't tend to learn about in yoga teacher training, but which definitely have implications for how we teach and practice yoga. Also included are multiple scientific references for each point. I invite you to read these points with an open mind and a willingness to possibly question your own biases (because I know I have had to question my own many times as I continue to study and learn about the body!)

 

 

Insight #1: The SI joint is a strong, resilient structure that is supported by thick layers of some of the strongest ligaments and muscles in the body. [Ref, Ref, Ref]


Although the SI joints are some of the strongest joints in the body, we often receive the impression from our yoga teacher trainings that they are actually quite fragile structures that are vulnerable to injury and instability from the slightest misalignments in yoga. For example, we are sometimes taught that if we hold our pelvis "square" when we twist in poses like twisting triangle (parivrtta trikonasana), we can "tweak" our SI joints by pulling them out of alignment, and we should therefore instead always be mindful to let our pelvis turn slightly in the direction we are twisting in these poses. Another example is that we are often instructed in backbends like bridge pose (setu bandha sarvangasana) and locust pose (shalabhasana) to relax our glutes (or to at least soften them somewhat) because if we contract them too hard, this could injure our SI joints.

One reason we tend to believe that our SI joints are vulnerable to damage in yoga is that we generally learn about SI joint anatomy by looking at a skeleton model or a drawing like this one here:

 
 

When we see the bones by themselves like this, we can certainly get the impression that the sacrum can "slide around" relative to the pelvis easily, resulting in an SI joint that can be pulled "out of place" or "strained" due to small misalignments in yoga poses.

However, what we rarely see after learning about the bony anatomy of the SI joint's structure is an image like this, which depicts all of the extremely resilient, tough ligaments that surround and support the SI joints from all sides, holding them firmly in place:

The ligaments that support the SI joint include the anterior sacroiliac ligament, interosseus sacroiliac ligament, sacrotuberous ligament, posterior sacroiliac ligament, and sacrospinous ligament.

The ligaments that support the SI joint include the anterior sacroiliac ligament, interosseus sacroiliac ligament, sacrotuberous ligament, posterior sacroiliac ligament, and sacrospinous ligament.

 

A rarely-cited fact is that the ligaments of the SI joint include some of the strongest ligaments in the human body! [Ref]

If after seeing an image of the SI joint's ligamentous support, we were then shown an image like this one below, which depicts all of the thick musculature and fascia on top of all of those ligaments on top of the SI joints (including the powerful gluteus maximus, the largest muscle in the human body), we might have reason to be more confident and less fearful about this naturally strong, sturdy area of our body:

 
 

 

While our SI joint can certainly be injured and we can absolutely experience pain there (more on this in #4), it would take much more force to injure a healthy SI joint than the relatively low loads involved in a yoga practice.

 

Insight # 2: The SI joints are inherently stable by design, not inherently vulnerable. [RefRef, Ref]

The SI joints serve to transfer the load of the upper body to the lower body, as well as to distribute forces moving up the body from below. Therefore, stability is built into their very design so that these forces can be transferred efficiently through the pelvis.

In fact, the SI joints are so inherently stable that there is only the tiniest amount of movement available at these joints. While some sources state that the amount of motion available at the SI joint is a barely-perceptible 2-4 millimeters, other sources actually state that there is in fact no movement available at these joints at all.

 

Insight #3: Even if the SI joints could "slip out of place" easily, we don't have a reliable way to assess this in someone's body. [Ref, RefRef, Ref, Ref]

SI joint movement is so minute and difficult to identify with either manual palpation or radiographic imaging that none of the tests traditionally done to assess the SI joint have been shown to be reliable. Without an accurate method for testing the position and movement of an SI joint, how can we definitively know that someone's SI joint is "out of place", "misaligned", or "unstable" in the first place?

 

Insight #4: SI joint pain is certainly a common experience among yogis and non-yogis alike, but SI joint pain does not necessarily mean that there is an SI joint injury. [Ref]

His left hand would actually be a bit lower if this were truly SI joint pain. (I couldn't find a photo that showed the right spot - they all seem to feature general low back pain instead!)

His left hand would actually be a bit lower if this were truly SI joint pain. (I couldn't find a photo that showed the right spot - they all seem to feature general low back pain instead!)

Thankfully, insights from modern pain science are beginning to become more widely known in the yoga world, but if this topic is new to you, consider taking a look at the introduction to pain science article that I wrote for Yoga International a couple of years ago. It turns out that despite what we have traditionally been taught, pain and tissue damage often do not correlate on a 1:1 basis - especially when pain is experienced in a more persistent or chronic way. Pain is actually a much more complex, multi-factorial phenomenon than simply "I have tissue damage and therefore that is what is creating my pain."

As an example, if someone has SI joint pain and they have experienced a recent blunt force trauma to their pelvis region (think from a car accident or a major fall of some sort), then their pain is very likely due to an actual SI joint injury. Once this injury has healed, this pain should subside. In fact, my husband and I suspect that his SI joint may have been injured many years ago in yoga by a strong adjustment he received. His yoga teacher forcefully pulled both of his legs behind his head in a pose called dwipada sirsasana and he felt a searing pain at his left SI joint in that moment. Thankfully the injury healed, but this type of forceful, deep adjustment seems like it was enough to cause injury to his SI joint (or at least a strong protective output of pain in the area).

But in contrast to those examples of short-term pain associated with acute injury, when someone's SI joint pain is more long-term or chronic in nature (chronic pain is sometimes defined as pain lasting longer than 3 months), it's less likely that this pain is connected to a specific injury or damage to the area, and more likely that the person's nervous system is instead sensitive around that spot. Nervous system sensitivity and an output of pain can be the result of many different factors aside from actual tissue damage. Other influences include emotions, past experiences, stress levels, beliefs - and particularly beliefs about one's body. In fact, the more that someone believes that their SI joints are fragile and vulnerable, the more likely their nervous system is to perceive threat in that area and to output pain there. And conversely, the more someone learns that their SI joints are strong, inherently stable structures well-supported by some of the most durable ligaments and muscles of the body, the less likely their nervous system will be to perceive threat and output pain in this area. [Ref, Ref]

 

Insight #5: Warnings about protecting the SI joint in yoga are often unnecessary.

As we have seen, the SI joints are held stable by a ligamentous and musculature support structure that is strong and resilient - and the joints themselves have only a tiny amount of movement available (if any) in the first place. With this in mind, whether or not we hold our pelvis square when we twist in yoga is probably not a likely mechanism for SI joint injury either way, given the relatively low loads involved in the pose. And whether or not we squeeze our glutes in backbends in yoga is also unlikely to be a mechanism for SI joint injury; in fact, contrary to the common cautions in yoga, contracting our glutes in backbends has actually been shown to have a positive stabilizing effect on the SI joints. [Ref, Ref]

Additionally, it's common these days to hear warnings about "overstretching" the ligaments of the SI joints in yoga poses, leading to SI joint instability and pain. (I myself used to offer such cautions too - the idea just seems to make sense!) We are learning, however, that this is not actually how ligaments respond to stretching. During a stretch, a ligament lengthens temporarily, but then it returns to its resting length afterward (sometimes after a short recovery period.) Despite popular warnings, passive stretching has not been shown to lengthen and destabilize ligaments and joints. I have personally changed my perspective on this issue due to insights from newer research and teachings from my yoga biomechanics mentor Jules Mitchell.

(For more reading on the fascinating topic of stretching, ligaments, and joint instability with lots of research references cited, I encourage you to read this recent blog post by Greg Lehman, a researcher and clinician whose work I have followed and admired for quite some time now. But fair warning: this post is long and is really territory for the more serious body geeks among us. You can always jump right to "Questionable Assertion #3", which specifically addresses these topics and might offer some new, interesting information for you to ponder.)

 

IN CONCLUSION...

In summary, SI joint pain is common among yogis and non-yogis alike and there are many factors that can contribute to it, including physical, psychological, and social ones. How we align our body in yoga is probably not a mechanism for SI joint injury, though (strong, forceful adjustments by yoga teachers excepted!) Rather than worrying too much about alignment for SI joint protection, a more effective means to injury-prevention is to simply strengthen and condition the muscles and connective tissue that support the SI joint, so that their capacity to handle load increases.

Thank you for reading these 5 points with an open mind, and I hope to see you on the mat virtually or in person in the near future!

**Related: Keeping Your Yoga Teaching Current Online Training

[Microblog] Anatomy Geek Stretching Thought of the Day

ANATOMY GEEK THOUGHT OF THE DAY: We often think of a muscle contraction happening only when a muscle *shortens*. But muscles work just as often as they lengthen - picture your hamstrings and the way they lengthen while they work to control your swan dive into uttanasana (standing forward fold) in yoga. When a muscle works as it lengthens, this is called an *eccentric contraction*, and we move this way all the time in our normal human movements.

One of the core rules we tend to learn in our yoga teacher trainings is that after we've "worked" a muscle or muscle group, we should stretch that muscle group to "balance it out". But because muscles can and do actually contract through all of their ranges (short, long, somewhere in between, etc.), is it skillful to consider the opposite of a muscle contraction a *stretch*? Do these two "balance" each other out? If it turned out that they were not necessarily opposing actions, would this change the way you sequence your yoga classes at all?

Enjoy pondering this one, and feel free to let me know how it goes!

Three Alternatives to Pigeon Pose & A Brief Discussion About Stretching

(**Update February 2018: I have backed off the position I take in "Reason #2" of this blog post. Although passive, folded-forward pigeon pose doesn't offer much in terms of positive change for our tissues, I don't think it's as innately precarious for our joints as I used to (injuries generally happen from fast, strong, quick forces - not from a simple low-load stretch done for a bit.) So while I don't personally practice passive pigeon very often because I'd just prefer to do things that are more effective and more efficient for making change in my body - like the 3 great alternatives I feature in this post - I DO occasionally include it as an option in my classes again, and I don't fearmonger about the pose anymore today. Just FYI!)

I know I might be in the minority amongst yoga teachers, but even though yoga students tend to looove their pigeon pose, I have consciously chosen to forgo this pose in my classes for the past several years now. While I do teach variations of pigeon pose like reclined pigeon and standing pigeon chair, I don't generally teach the traditional version of this pose in which you lie in a passive, unsupported forward fold over the front leg.

 

WHY I SKIP PIGEON POSE - REASON #1

I have two main reasons for skipping pigeon pose in my classes. The first is that it doesn't offer much in the way of positive change for the tissues of the body. We generally tend to think of pigeon pose as a stretch designed to increase the flexibility of the hips. But we've actually learned quite a bit more from scientific research in recent years about how stretching works (although there is still a ton that we don't know!), and thanks to my brilliant mentor Jules Mitchell, much of this new information is making its way to the yoga community.

One of the biggest realizations that I've learned about stretching is that flexibility is a much more complex topic than we've generally learned from our yoga teacher trainings, workshops, books, and other studies. The prevailing approach to flexibility in most yoga classes (and in much of the health/fitness world in general) is that if someone lacks range of motion in a joint, the solution is to stretch the muscles and fascia that cross the joint to lengthen them out. Then we get longer tissues and voila! - we can stretch further in that direction. By this reasoning, the solution to the ubiquitous "tight hips" that many people claim to have is to simply stretch one's hips out in pigeon pose for a long time at the end of every yoga class - a practice that we yogis are quite familiar with!

But the assumption that in order to solve all inflexibility issues, tissues simply need to be stretched out does not take into account the many other likely factors that could be causing the inflexibility - factors that passive stretching does not actually address. It reminds me of pain science and how easy it is to attribute pain simply to structural factors like tissue damage, poor alignment, or dysfunctional movement patterns, when the bigger picture of pain is truly so much more complex than this. The brain's decision to output a pain experience is multifactorial and completely unique to each individual - and in the case of persistent pain, is actually rarely due to a single structural reason like tissue damage.

Similarly, if someone experiences what they would call "tight" hips ("tight" of course being a vague, subjective word with no single definition for all bodies), the possible reasons for this tightness are many and varied, from a restriction in the capsule of the joint itself (which would not be addressed by passive stretching) to issues in how the brain is coordinating muscle activity (more of a motor control/neuromotor issue that is also not solved by passive stretching). Therefore, when we as a yoga community assume that the solution to all inflexibility issues is to stretch our tissues out in poses like pigeon pose, we are missing a much larger picture of how flexibility, performance, and joint function works.

This image of pigeon pose that I found online makes me feel weird. :)

This image of pigeon pose that I found online makes me feel weird. :)

WHY I SKIP PIGEON POSE - REASON #2

With all of that said, this isn't the only reason that I choose to skip pigeon pose in my classes. Even though passive stretching is not the universal solution to inflexibility issues that we yogis tend to believe it is, it still has some nice benefits, and I certainly include some passive poses in my classes. But pigeon pose also happens to incorporate some precarious joint positioning for the front knee and hip with the added weight of the torso and upper body lying on top of them, which isn't necessarily beneficial for these joints. Although there are ways to modify the pose to support these joints in a healthy way, these options are rarely offered or taught in detail in most yoga classes. And even if they were, most yoga studios don't have enough props to support every student the way they would need to be set up for optimal loading of the front knee and hip.
 

THREE ALTERNATIVES TO PIGEON POSE

And so, without further ado, I present to you... three alternatives to pigeon pose! These are three excellent ways that a pose like pigeon pose can be practiced, but with the added benefit of positive change for the tissues of the hip and a more efficient path toward increased flexibility. You'll notice that all three examples incorporate some degree of muscle activation (versus assuming the poses passively). This is because research has suggested that strengthening muscles through their full range will result in more flexibility gains faster than passive stretching alone. This is likely because when we actively contract our muscles during a stretch, this signals our nervous system that this range of motion is safe, and our nervous system will therefore be more likely to allow more range of motion in the future. Additionally, when we contract our muscles during a stretch, we load our connective tissues via muscular force, which increases their load-bearing capacity (i.e. their strength) over time. Strong connective tissues equals strong, efficient movement, functional joints, and decreased risk of injuries in the future.

Consider offering these options as an alternative to traditional pigeon pose in your yoga classes, or if you find yourself in a yoga class in which pigeon pose is taught, consider trying one of these "pigeon-ish" poses instead. (Just for the record, I don't think pigeon is an absolutely terrible pose, and I would certainly not "judge" a yoga teacher for including it in their class - pigeon is extremely ubiquitous in our yoga community and it sometimes feels like our students almost expect it. But once you learn a bit more about current stretching science and the connection between strength and flexibility, you might be inspired to change up what you offer to reflect these new understandings.)

If you decide to experiment with these pigeon alternatives, notice how it feels to strengthen your hips instead of passively stretch them in this classic pose, and enjoy the benefits that these new movements offer to your body and mind! (Also be sure to check out the further reading resources listed below these videos...)

**Related: Keeping Your Yoga Teaching Current Online Training

 
 
 

Further Reading & Exploration

Blog Post: Resistance Stretching with Charlie Reid & Jules Mitchell

Related Online Workshop by Jenni: Re-Imagining Hip Openers: A Yoga Anatomy Workshop

Related Online Class by Jenni: Hips-Focused Practice #2

Related Blog Post by Jenni: Stretching Is In Your Brain: A New Paradigm of Flexibility & Yoga